A discussion on the positive and negative image of police officers in the media

Media and television representations of criminals The media cover an extensive part of crime, criminals, and the criminal justice system. Newspapers all over the world include daily stories of criminal acts, whether it is a small community or a large metropolis, the same types of stories get covered, which are all about crime. When it comes to television, the stories are the same, which includes crime-related stories leading the local news programs and television dramas and movies being devoted to issues of criminal justice.

A discussion on the positive and negative image of police officers in the media

How Social Media Is Changing Law Enforcement

The program — a partnership between Government Technology and e. The Digital Communities program also conducts the annual Digital Cities and Digital Counties surveys, which track technology trends and identify and promote best practices in local government.

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A discussion on the positive and negative image of police officers in the media

Law enforcement tools have evolved from wanted posters to police radio, patrol cars and social networks, such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

Community policing today has also expanded through social networking to locate missing children, alert neighbors of suspicious activity and even inform the public about crimes committed in their neighborhoods.

The Media’s Role in Police-Community Relations

But social networking is a tool that cuts both ways. Flash mobs organized online in Philadelphia swarmed stores to shoplift and attack pedestrians; pedophiles use social networking platforms to share photos and video; and terrorists recruit members and plan attacks via these tools.

Even the courts have been affected. Jurors have disregarded instructions and have conducted online research, shared their opinions on Twitter from the jury box, and even posted biased comments on their Facebook pages.

Police in the Entertainment Media

From a character tweet to a 56 MB video clip, social networking is a force that cannot be denied or ignored. We hope this special section will assist law enforcement in embracing and understanding this phenomenon. Communication is mobile, motivation may be mass destruction and targets include the innocent.

As law enforcement agencies grapple with this new reality, they inevitably encounter social media and social networks. In August, for example, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter announced an expanded curfew for minors following flash mob violence. Flash mobs — organized online through various social media — convene at a predetermined time and place for a specific purpose.

Though many are harmless or merely pranks, in Philadelphia, the purpose was to rob pedestrians and then swarm through stores shoplifting. In perhaps an ill-considered response, BART shut down wireless service in the subway to disrupt organizers, which outraged protesters and created yet more trouble.

But social media is having a positive impact, too. The platforms can be used by law enforcement to broaden intelligence gathering and leverage public support. We got a joint terrorism task force involved and worked with the feds.

The two suspects were arrested, and no one was hurt. Often, perpetrators brag about their crimes on social networks, and child pornographers and sexual predators have been located and apprehended as a result of their online activities. Mistrials also have occurred because jurors have disregarded instructions and researched cases online, used Twitter to share their opinions from the jury box, or have posted biased comments on their Facebook pages.

For example, in late during the Chandra Levy murder trial, a prospective juror was dismissed for using Twitter to discuss the case. And in another case, a juror in California was discovered blogging details of a murder case during the trial.

Although social media can help enlist public support, it also can turn on a dime and do the opposite, due in part to the casual nature of the media. In a wake-up call for law enforcement, an Albuquerque, N.

A discussion on the positive and negative image of police officers in the media

In that case — Glik v. Cunniffe — the 1st U. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that such videotaping is a free speech right protected under the First Amendment. According to Dunwoody, Ga. In an article written for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Grogan outlined three reasons for this: Social networks offer a natural platform for extending community policing efforts.

They provide a way for departments to promote positive accomplishments. And finally, the continuing popularity of these networks simply makes them hard to ignore. Cohen of the Indiana State Police has been training state and local police agencies on social media usage since He said that while criminals are using mobile devices to hide their activities, social media offers huge benefits to law enforcement.

Now you can just go to blogs, video or image sharing sites, and in many cases, find those pictures. Photo background information was used last year to find a child pornographer and his victim, Cohen said. Metadata and geotagging of images can help locate where and when photos were taken.

Investigators also can get help from government websites, which now provide large amounts of information online. You can find out who my neighbors are, what my neighbors do for a living — all this information is available. Of course I would.The media displays a negative and positive image when it comes to police officers.

MEDIA IMAGES OF POLICING

Society sees both sides from the media by reflecting how they view police in their own communities. The media displays a negative and positive image when it comes to police officers.

Society sees both sides from the media by reflecting how they view police in their own communities. In our communities we also see police getting shot or often finding themselves in a bad situation.

The negative images we see and hear are police that are corrupt or brutally beating harmless suspects. The positive images would be that they have saved an innocent life in a hostage situation.

The media portrays the police in many different ways/5(1). The media displays a negative and positive image when it comes to police officers.

Society sees both sides from the media reflecting how they view police in their own communities. In our communities we also see police getting shot or often finding themselves in a bad situation.

Media spin on violence against police Aaron Major PhD on December 28, News stories of officers being attacked and killed while in the line of duty have become regular features of the nightly news broadcast, but does this increase in coverage reflect an increase in reality?

Although this general public image of the police is positive, the image varies according to social group and along specific dimensions. Because fairness is a fundamental value for democratic policing, the public image of the police held by various racial groups has been a central issue of study.

Media spin on violence against police - Sociological Images